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Poets Steve Henn & Kaveh Akbar at IU South Bend
Thursday, November 16, 2017
6:00pm A Discussion with Kaveh Akbar in room 1190 Wiekamp Hall
7:30pm Poetry Reading by Henn & Akbar in 1001 Wiekamp Hall
on the campus of IU South Bend / free and open to the public / books available for sale
bio-2016Steve Henn is the author of And God Said: Let There Be Evolution! (NYQBooks, 2012) and Unacknowledged Legislations (NYQBooks, 2011). Bloomington microlabel Auris Apothecary released a lathe cut recording and booklet of several poems called Cancel the Apocalypse (2015). His chapbooks include Subvert the Dominant Paradigm! (Boneworld Publishing/Musclehead Press 2009) and The 30th Anniversary Warsaw Community Commemorative Book Burning (Pudding House, 2007). He’s a full-time dad, a full-time high school English teacher, a frequent reader of O.P.P. (other people’s poetry) and an occasional drummer in ersatz basement bands, including The Lawnballs, Rocket Surgeons, Invisible Robots, An Elaborate Hoax, and Objects in Motion. He wrote most of the lyrics for the Robots album available online called Sunday Beer. He’s been a featured reader at the Uptown Poetry Slam, the Indianapolis Poetry Slam, and in the Indiana University South Bend Fall Writers Series. He’s organized many a poetry event in his hometown at the Oak and Alley / Three Crowns Coffee site in Warsaw, including such colorful show titles as “Stupider than Cupider,” “Funny Ha Ha or Funny Strange?,” and “Jolly Melancholy.” He’s probably got another 20 years of teaching to go before he can even consider writing and reading poems all the day long, all the year round. Hopefully they’ve got the high speed rail between Warsaw and Chicago built by then.

akbarKaveh Akbar’s poems appear recently or soon in The New Yorker, Poetry, The New York Times, The Nation, Tin House, The Guardian, Ploughshares, FIELD, Georgia Review, PBS NewsHour, Harvard Review, American Poetry Review, Narrative, The Poetry Review, AGNI, New England Review, A Public Space, Prairie Schooner, Virginia Quarterly Review, Poetry International, Best New Poets 2016, Guernica, Boston Review, and elsewhere. His debut full-length collection, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, is just out with Alice James in the US and Penguin in the UK, and his chapbook, Portrait of the Alcoholic, was published by Sibling Rivalry Press. The recipient of a 2016 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, a Pushcart Prize, and the Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, Kaveh was born in Tehran, Iran, and currently lives and teaches in Florida. Kaveh founded and edits Divedapper, a home for dialogues with the most vital voices in contemporary poetry.

 
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Thanks to all those who came to the Pub Hub open house last week. What a crowd!

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We Dove into Submissions

Thanks to all those who came out for the “Dive into Submissions” workshop co-hosted by the Publications Commons (Pub Hub!) and Lit Literary Collective. The former brought the pizza; the latter brought the powerpoint. Presenters were Krista Cox, Erin Marie Hall, and Kelcey Parker Ervick (me).

 

Please join us for this double-header of awesome events on Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017

Dive into Subs Submissions Workshop – and free pizza!
5:30-7:00pm in 2170 Wiekamp Hall at IU South Bend
sponsored by Lit Literary Collective and the Publications Commons/PUB HUB
presenters: Krista Cox, Erin Marie Hall, Kelcey Parker Ervick

Want to submit your work, but not sure where to begin? Actively submitting already, but want some tips & tricks? Don’t miss this submissions workshop!

Topics include:
• There Are One Billionty Journals, Where the Hell do I Send this Stuff?
• I Have One Billionty Pieces, How do I Decide what to Send?
• Formatting isn’t Just for Clearing Evidence from your Hard Drive
• This Shouldn’t Be This Hard: Cover Letters
• Only Human: What on Earth Editors are Thinking
• I’m a Writer, Not a Data Scientist: Tracking Submissions
• How Rejections are Kinda Sorta like Exercise Maybe

Poetry Reading by Nate Pritts
Winner of the 42 Miles Press Poetry Prize for Decoherence
7:30pm on the 3rd Floor Bridge of Wiekamp Hall at IU South Bend

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Nate Pritts is the author of eight books of poetry, including Decoherence, which won the 42 Miles Press Poetry Award and will be published in the fall of 2017.

His most recent collection is Post Human (2016) which Publishers Weekly says “leads readers through a poetic dystopia that reveals the fragility of the human relationship with technology. Weaving his poems together as a meditative critique of technology and its numbing effect on the everyday, Pritts asks readers to imagine other possibilities amid ‘this daily flood/ of ephemera, this electronic life.'”

Publishers Weekly described his fifth book, Sweet Nothing (2011), as “both baroque and irreverent, banal and romantic, his poems […] arrive at a place of vulnerability and sincerity.” POETRY Magazine called The Wonderfull Yeare (2009), “rich, vivid, intimate, & somewhat troubled” while The Rumpus called Big Bright Sun (2010) “a textual record of mistakes made and insights gleaned…[in] a voice that knows its part in self-destruction.” His poems, and writings about poetry, have been published in American Poetry Review, Poets & Writers, Writers Digest and many other places.

He is the Director and Founding Editor of H_NGM_N (2001), an independent publishing house that started as a mimeograph ‘zine and which has grown to encompass an annual online journal, an occasional digital chapbook series, a continuing series of single-author books and sporadic limited edition/low-fi projects. Pritts is Associate Professor at Ashford University where he serves as Curriculum Lead and Administrative head of the Film program. He lives in the Finger Lakes region of New York state.

IUSB’s Creative Writing Club is meeting next Monday, Sept 11th, from 6:00-7:00 in Wiekamp Hall room 3001. The club will be holding a workshop, so if anyone has a piece they would like to workshop, they should bring copies to the meeting.

The club will meet every other week this semester. All are welcome!

 

Welcome Week POEM

“Poem Starts Here” – This is a collaborative, community poem typed by visitors to the English Department’s Welcome Week table, August 21-22, 2017. One line per person. Solar eclipse on the mind. (Most frequent question: “Where’s the return key?” Answer: “See that big silver handle/razor-looking thing? Pull it all the way to the left.”)

austin

ANALECTA is IU South Bend’s award-winning literary journal. It is published once a year under the guidance of a student editor who selects the best poetry, fiction, drama, and artwork from IUSB students. The editor for the 2018 issue is Austin Veldman. Here, Austin answers a few questions about his new position…
Why did you apply to be editor of Analecta?
When I think about some of the decisions I have made over the last few years, I count moving from IU Bloomington to IUSB among one of the best. I have a lot of love for the English program here. While I have always been a writer, my majors while in Bloomington did not reflect this: from Recording Arts in the Jacobs School of Music to Telecommunications: Design and Production. My move back to South Bend coincided with a decision to study exactly what I loved: writing. I had a deep desire to get what I really wanted out of college and to become a better writer. With this major change and conviction to improve I began taking creative writing courses at IUSB. This elevated my hobby of writing into a focal point of my life. Analecta was a part of this perfect storm. My first publication of any kind, special for any writer, was in vol. 45 of Analecta. As a graduate student, I felt I had the skills necessary to take on the challenge of editing this special journal. It presented itself as an opportunity to be a part of the great energy that IUSB’s English Department and the students of IUSB have cultivated.  

What are you most excited about when you think of editing Analecta this year?
The first thing that I want to say is that I am really excited to design an Analecta that looks good. I want this thing to just look beautiful, to make you want to pick it up just by its cover. I want readers to not be distracted by the formatting when reading the art within; the format should contribute to the flow. I get a kick out of really well designed books in which, through their sharp cleanness and solid formatting, put on an air of professionalism. The design and formatting becomes art on its own. Besides this, I am of course excited to read new work for the first time. To have the opportunity to discover some great writing and to be part of a process that places it before a broader audience is a responsibility I feel honored to undertake. 

What kind of background experience​ do you have with writing, editing, and Analecta?
My personal journal with writing began in songwriting. I have been playing guitar and writing songs since I was thirteen. Also around this time in my life I read The Lord of the Rings for the first time. It was this work, arguably the greatest work of creative fiction of all time, that made me realize that I wanted to be a writer. The sheer magnitude of the world that J. R. R. Tolkien created, along with his truly beautiful and poetic prose, sparked my desire and imagination. I wrote a lot of fantasy themed scenes throughout high school: great battles, journeys, and councils. I had a desire to write a novel, but a solid plot-line did not begin to emerge until my freshman year of high school. For five years I plotted and built my own world, beginning the writing of the first draft around the same time I began classes at South Bend. This first draft is now nearly finished, a long epic that is now 140k words (637 MS pages) and will probably cap out around 160k. This is perhaps too long, but that is what editing is for, right?

Perhaps most definitively, I took a poetry class with David Dodd Lee. For years I had been writing a form of poetry in songwriting, yet with poetry the ‘rules’ that came with writing a song were made to hit the road, so to speak. I learned to express with a freedom that sparked a love for writing poetry. I now have several publications outside of Analecta and am actively submitting my work to literary journals. I will be a life-long poet.

As far as editing experience goes, I have been helping 42 Miles Press by being a first-reader on incoming manuscripts. It was through this that I am discovering a love for the behind the scenes work that is involved with presses and is invaluable experience. Also, I have recently started an online journal: Twyckenham Notes (twyckenhamnotes.com). TN’s aesthetic statement was inspired specifically by the tangible energy and experience of living in South Bend. 

What ideas do you have in mind for the 2018 issue?
What is important beyond all else for me is producing a journal that emits professionalism in its design and quality of the art within. I want to help make something that we can be proud of. Beyond this, I have a desire to incorporate alternative media into the 2018 Analecta experience. One option is to have the winners of Student Writing Awards record high-quality audio recordings of their winning poetry, stories, or non-fiction. Pushing this further, we could have a video recording of said readings. I think that this could be a very cool and engaging way to bring the art to more students in a way that perhaps has not been done before. Overall, I am excited and honored to be editor of Analecta and I look forward to reading everyone’s wonderful work. We have something really great going on here at IUSB. If you are a student reading this and have some art, stories, poems, or non-fiction, please consider submitting to the coming issue of Analecta.

 

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